A Weekend Diary

…words and images from England's green and pleasant land…

Archive for the category “Kent”

Around and about…Hampshire, London and Kent…

A derelict red telephone box, Titchfield, Hampshire...

A derelict red telephone box, Titchfield, Hampshire…

Graffiti, Portsmouth City Centre...

Graffiti, Portsmouth City Centre…

A midweek early evening ramble around Swanmore, Hampshire…

A Swanmore cottage...

A Swanmore cottage…

Some friendly Swanmore sheep...

Some friendly Swanmore sheep…

Some fellow ramblers...

Some fellow ramblers…

A Swanmore sky...

A Swanmore sky…

A couple from London’s South Bank…

London's South Bank...

London’s South Bank…

An evening skyline on the South Bank...

An evening skyline on the South Bank…

And back to Kent today, to visit a sister in Cuxton, then to Gillingham, for an abortive attempt to see the Gills clinch the League Two title…I’d backed them with ten quid at 10-1 at the beginning of the season ;)…

Cuxton railway station, Kent...

Cuxton railway station, Kent…

Exploring Cuxton...

Exploring Cuxton…

Match sold out ...:(...

Match sold out …:(…

So, a retreat to the Southern Belle pub, at the end of Gillingham High Street, and a pint of Stella Artois ;)…

All's well that ends well; Gillingham 2 AFC Wimbledon 2...and Gillingham League Two champions :)...

All’s well that ends well; Gillingham 2 AFC Wimbledon 2…and Gillingham League Two champions :)…

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A Cuxton carving, some Covent Garden pottery and a Steep monument…

I plan to visit my sister in the Kentish village of Cuxton on Saturday next, and here’s a photograph dating from my last visit to Cuxton, on Boxing Day, 2011, of a carved bench on Bush Hill…

A carved bench, Bush Hill, Cuxton, Kent

A carved bench, Bush Hill, Cuxton, Kent

And on the theme of handicrafts, here’s a stall I came across at Covent Garden Market in central London, in 2007 I believe it was…

A pottery stall, Covent Garden Market...

A pottery stall, Covent Garden Market…

Our after-work rambling group has its first outing this coming Thursday, around Swanmore in Hampshire, so here are a couple of images from a previous outing, in the vicinity of Steep, near Petersfield, also in Hampshire. Steep is associated with the poet Edward Thomas, who died at Arras in the First World War. The two images here are followed by Thomas’s poem ‘Adlestrop’, which happens to be one of my favourites, so here it is…

A misty Steep landscape, early spring 2011

A misty Steep landscape, early spring 2011

Hillside monument to Edward Thomas, at Steep, Hampshire

Hillside monument to Edward Thomas, at Steep, Hampshire

Adlestrop

Yes, I remember Adlestrop —
The name, because one afternoon
Of heat the express-train drew up there
Unwontedly. It was late June.

The steam hissed. Someone cleared his throat.
No one left and no one came
On the bare platform. What I saw
Was Adlestrop — only the name

And willows, willow-herb, and grass,
And meadowsweet, and haycocks dry,
No whit less still and lonely fair
Than the high cloudlets in the sky.

And for that minute a blackbird sang
Close by, and round him, mistier,
Farther and farther, all the birds
Of Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire.

Edward Thomas (1878-1917)

Journeying across the years…

I spent much of today tidying up my flat in north London, giving a literal meaning to ‘The Way is gained by daily loss…’ ;). Whatever, it meant that I wasn’t much inclined to go out picture-taking today, and I decided instead to indulge myself by uploading some of my favourite photos from bygone years. That’s something that would have definitely been verboten with last year’s photoblog, when it was important to me that the images originated from the within the specific day of the 366 that they were assigned to :).

So here are half a dozen photos taken between 1982 and 2006, all but one of them naturally enough taken with 35mm cameras, and probably all taken on colour slide film, which I subsequently converted to digital images via a Nikon Coolscan film scanner.

The first, second and sixth photos below I’ve downloaded from my flickr account, while the other three I simply uploaded from the hard disk of my PC.

The first was taken ‘on a drizzly Wednesday afternoon’ in 1982, and the bloke with the bird on his head was actually feeding the seagulls at the time. Even so, I think I was fortunate with the combination of elements in this particular shot, and I especially like the two gulls sitting on the wall watching, and perhaps doing the bird equivalent of laughing at what they see before them ;). Incidentally, at that time in the early 1980s, I was working in a factory in south-east London, doing two 15 hour shifts at weekends, then having the rest of the week off, which gave me a great opportunity to do a lot of photography in central London, which I often took advantage of :).

Man with a seagull on his head...

Man with a seagull on his head…

As for the next picture, taken on 23rd July, 1984, I like the inherent paradox of militant vegetarians advocating the slaughter of butchers! I’ve been a vegetarian for around three decades now, but I can’t say I’ve ever had murderous thoughts about butchers ;).

Chapel Market, Islington, London

Chapel Market, Islington, London

I was born in the county of Kent and this sunset was taken around West Malling, which is the area in which my Mum still lives…the picture probably dates from the 1980s sometime…

Sunset at Luck's Hill, West Malling, Kent

Sunset at Luck’s Hill, West Malling, Kent

The following photograph dates from the summer solstice of 1992, when I travelled up to Scotland to run my one and only Marathon race, around Loch Rannoch. It took me just under four hours, but I remember it being a lovely June day, and I have fond memories of it all :).

Mount Schiehallion, by Loch Rannoch, Perthshire, Scotland

Mount Schiehallion, by Loch Rannoch, Perthshire, Scotland

Below is what is now known as The London Eye, but when it was opened on the 31st December 1999, it was still called The Millennium Wheel. There must now be billions of photographs of The London Eye, although very few of them will show it looking quite like this ;).

The Millennium Wheel, being raised to the vertical, in the summer of 1999

The Millennium Wheel, being raised to the vertical, in the summer of 1999

Finally, I have spent countless hours on London’s South Bank, and many of them in the Royal Festival Hall, where this photograph was taken on the 9th June, 2007. Xue Fei was playing (exquisitely!) Francisco Tárrega’s ‘Recuerdos de la Alhambra’, which she described that afternoon as her favourite piece of music, and it was just a real privilege to be there to hear her play it :). It was a free concert incidentally, in the Foyer, to celebrate the re-opening of the Royal Festival Hall after a two year closure for renovations. This photograph was taken with a Panasonic Lumix DMC LZ1 digital compact camera (which, ironically, I found today whilst tidying up the flat, and noticed that I’d last used it in 2009 ;)).

The Chinese classical guitarist Yang Xue Fei...

The Chinese classical guitarist Yang Xue Fei…

Mothering Sunday…

The quaint and slightly archaic title to this post tells us, that, in the UK at least, today is Mother’s Day, and I’ll be off to Kent later to join my three sisters in celebrating the afternoon chez maman. So, only the one photo today, and it’s of the card I’ll be giving to my Mum later…so don’t you dare tell her; I want it to be a surprise… 😉

Happy Mother's Day1 :) xx

Happy Mother’s Day! 🙂 xx

 

A trip down to Kent via Cannon Street…

Because of track engineering work, there were no trains out of Victoria down to Kent this weekend, so I made a rare visit to Cannon Street station for the revised timetable. I didn’t mind; variety is the spice of life and all that, and moreover, there was an element of nostalgia to it all, as I lived in south-east London throughout the 1980s, so train journeys to Cannon Street and Charing Cross via London Bridge were a commonplace then. So I caught the Northern Line down to London Bridge late morning and walked to Cannon Street for my train there…

Crossing London Bridge, how can you not look downstream and capture what you see...

Crossing London Bridge, how can you not look downstream and capture what you see…

Cannon Street mainline station is essentially a commuter station, and I think is normally closed at weekends, but not today...

Cannon Street mainline station is essentially a commuter station, and I think is normally closed at weekends, but not today…

Later this year, I'll be uploading some photos of London taken from the top of The Shard, but for now, this is just a snatched shot taken from the train carriage as we moved out of London Bridge Station...

Later this year, I’ll be uploading some photos of London taken from the top of The Shard, but for now, this is just a snatched shot taken from the train carriage as we moved out of London Bridge Station…

The trip down to Kent was a fortnightly one I make to visit my Mum, and as I was making my way to her home, I passed a blackbird in some nearby park land, so here he is ;)...

The trip down to Kent was a fortnightly one I make to visit my Mum, and as I was making my way to her home, I passed a blackbird in some nearby park land, so here he is ;)…

Back at London Bridge now, and here's a poster on the Tube station platform :)...

Back at London Bridge now, and here’s a poster on the Tube station platform :)…

A interesting choice of painting on a car in Naylor Road, Whetstone, London N20 ;)

A interesting choice of painting on a car in Naylor Road, Whetstone, London N20 😉

Anvil Man, Bonnie, and Victoria Station…

Anvil Man, by Peter Lunn

Anvil Man, by Peter Lunn

The pedestrianised part of West Street, in Fareham, Hampshire, is home to a number of modern sculptures, constituting the Henry Cort Collection, and easily my favourite amongst them is Anvil Man above ;). He got a fresh coat of paint last summer, to prepare for the visit of The Princess Royal, who came to Fareham to open a nearby children’s play area commemorating the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee.

Bonnie, in Grannies' Attic.

Bonnie, in Grannies’ Attic.

I’m also very fond of Albert Road in Southsea, a street with considerable character. As I was walking along it this morning, this sunlit doll in the window of Grannies’ Attic caught my eye. When I took the photograph, I didn’t notice that she was holding a sign in her left hand, which reads ‘My name is Bonnie’. Coincidence is a curious thing sometimes; at present I am reading John Suchet’s poignant tale of his wife’s dementia, a book entitled ‘My Bonnie’.

The 16:37 Ashford International train, at Platform 2, Victoria station...

The 16:37 Ashford International train, at Platform 2, Victoria station…

I spent the first two dozen years of my life living in the county of Kent, so this is a very familiar sight to me, a train about to head out of Victoria station, through south-east London surburbs, and deep into the Kentish countryside…

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